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Florida

Manatees and astronauts, sophisticated cities and wildflower meadows. Florida's stretch of the Greenway offers great contrasts.

Total Miles, Spine Route

579

Miles of Protected Greenway

207.35

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Click the map for an interactive version

Current Progress

The East Coast Greenway threads it way across nearly 600 miles in Florida. From Georgia, the Greenway enters the state at Fernandina Beach, then makes its way through 13 counties before reaching Key West, the southernmost mainland point of the United States. Travel is largely along the coast through seaside villages, America’s earliest historic sites, vast nature preserves, and major cities that include Jacksonville and Miami.

Much of the Greenway through Florida is on side path that runs along Highway A1A. It concludes with the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail, which hops from island to island for 106 miles (more than half of which is completed trail).

Please note: To cross between Georgia and Florida across the St. John's River, as an alternative to riding Route 17, touring cyclists can call Amelia River Cruises, 904-261-9972, to secure a chartered ferry (best for groups, due to cost) or Camden Bicycle Center, 912-576-9696, for an on-road "ferry" (shopping at the bike store encouraged).

 

 

Florida Contacts

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Designated Trails in Florida

Mileage counts reflect the portion of each trail that is part of East Coast Greenway.

  • Amelia Island Trail, Nassau County; 6.2 mi

  • River to the Sea Trail, Flagler County; 18.6 mi

  • Jacksonville North Bank Riverwalk, Jacksonville; 2 mi

  • St. Johns River Ferry, Ft. George-Mayport; 0.4 mi

  • Timucuan Trail; 4.9 mi

  • Palatka-St. Augustine State Trail, St. Johns Co.; 8.5 mi

  • Mickler Trail, St. Augustine Beach; 1.5 mi

  • Halifax River Trail, Holly Hill & Daytona Beach; 3 mi

  • Spring-to-Spring Trail & East Central Regional Rail Trail, Volusia Co.; 17.4 mi

  • Eastern Central Regional Rail-Trail, Titusville FL; 1.4 mi

  • A1A sidepath, Brevard County; 17.4 mi

  • A1A Sidepath, Indian River County ; 22.75 mi

  • Prima Vista Blvd & Walton Road sidepaths, St. Lucie Co. FL, 1.3 mi

  • Green River Parkway Trail, Martin Co. – Port St. Lucie; 5.8 mi

  • Seabranch Trail, Martin Co., 2.8 mi

  • Jupiter Riverwalk, Jupiter; 2.1 mi

  • West Palm Beach Trail, West Palm Beach; 5.7 mi

  • A1A sidepath, Boca Raton; 3.1 mi

  • Hollywood Broadwalk, Hollywood; 1.2 mi

  • Atlantic Greenway, Miami Beach; 4.5 mi

  • M Path / South Dade Greenway, Miami-Dade County; 30 mi

  • Overseas Heritage Trail, Key Largo-Key West; 74.8 mi

florida heritage trail
Seven-mile bridge along the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail. Visit Florida photo

Converging Trails: A Celebration in Titusville

In late February 2018, the community of Titusville and Brevard County, Florida, celebrated the completion of a new greenway intersecting with the Coast to Coast Trail (220 miles) and the St.Johns River to Sea Loop Trail (260 miles) along with the East Coast Greenway. The 15-mile Florida East Central Regional Rail Trail within Brevard County stretches from Canaveral Avenue in Titusville to the Volusia County line. A ribbon-cutting on Friday was followed by a community ride on Saturday. The ride targeted 300 cyclists but registration was cut off at 400 riders and 450 riders actually took part in the 40, 30, 20, and 5-mile rides.

Paul Haydt, Florida coordinator for the East Coast Greenway Alliance, presents a commemorative Greenway tile to Robin Birdsong, director of Florida's SUN Trail program during the Titusville ribbon-cutting ceremonies.

Paul Haydt, Florida coordinator for the East Coast Greenway Alliance, presents a commemorative Greenway tile to Robin Birdsong, director of Florida's SUN Trail program during the Titusville ribbon-cutting ceremonies.

Cyclists of all ages test out the new trail, which intersects with Florida's Coast to Coast Trail (220 miles), the St. Johns River to Sea Loop Trail (260 miles) and the East Coast Greenway.

Cyclists of all ages test out the new trail, which intersects with Florida's Coast to Coast Trail (220 miles), the St. Johns River to Sea Loop Trail (260 miles) and the East Coast Greenway.

Eric Draper, director of the Florida State Parks System, greets attendees at the ribbon-cutting in Titusville.

Eric Draper, director of the Florida State Parks System, greets attendees at the ribbon-cutting in Titusville.

Cyclists of all ages test out the new trail, which intersects with Florida's Coast to Coast Trail (220 miles), the St. Johns River to Sea Loop Trail (260 miles) and the East Coast Greenway.

Cyclists of all ages test out the new trail, which intersects with Florida's Coast to Coast Trail (220 miles), the St. Johns River to Sea Loop Trail (260 miles) and the East Coast Greenway.

Titusville Mayor Walt Johnson addresses the VIPs and officials attending the "Converging Trails" ribbon-cutting in his city.

Titusville Mayor Walt Johnson addresses the VIPs and officials attending the "Converging Trails" ribbon-cutting in his city.

Florida and Titusville officials and VIPs celebrate the trail opening. Photo by Lisa Hamel, Hometown News

Florida and Titusville officials and VIPs celebrate the trail opening. Photo by Lisa Hamel, Hometown News

Florida Partners, East Coast River Relay

Thanks to the organizations and individuals who helped us celebrate the River Relay in Florida in October 2017, from Fernandina Beach to Key Largo.

Florida Partners, East Coast River Relay

Our Partners in Florida

Partners include but are not limited to:

News and features of interest

titusville greenway
July 30, 2018

Florida greenway enjoying growth spurt

dino and bike
August 7, 2018

Executive director's letter: Going big, like a dino

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May 11, 2018

Hugging the coast, week 1: Key West to Amelia Island, FL

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